Building brighter tomorrows
for the boys of today.

U. S. History

This course will explore the cultural and social development of the United States and the role of migration and immigration of diverse peoples, cultures, and social influences on the nation’s growth. Students will examine common traits, beliefs, and characteristics that unite the United States as a nation and a society. Students will examine the political, social, and economic responses to industrial and technological advancements. Students will explore multiple perspectives throughout the growth and development of the United States. Subject material will look at the Revolutionary period, development of the Constitution, exploration and expansion, emergence as a world power, and the country’s role in the contemporary world.

World History

The study of World History provides students multiple opportunities to build their critical thinking, writing, and public speaking skills. Students will develop skills to interpret evidence and evaluate multiple resources. Subject matter examines the rise and development of civilization and the roles of geography, human innovation, ideas, ideology, expansion, war, migration and settlement of human populations in shaping civilizations. Material will explore the economic and social development of human civilization while building an understanding of the evolution of democracy. Subject matter looks at early civilizations, the time of empires, development of Europe, Industrialization, Imperialism, World War, nuclear weapons, the role of the United Nations, and the roles of the Middle East, China, and Russia.

Geography-Eastern Hemisphere

This course seeks to build an understanding of the cultural and social developmenst of human societies. Subject matter looks at the context and impact of mass migration/invasion and colonization on indigenous eastern cultures. It compares the varied approaches of European colonization in the Eastern Hemisphere, their cultural and environmental impacts, and explores origins and spread of the world’s major religions. Course will examine how human activity affects the physical environment and how physical environment impacts human living conditions. Basic economic concepts and their impacts will be examined. Students will explore differing cultural perspectives and their global interdependence.

Geography-Western Hemisphere

This course seeks to build an understanding of the cultural and social developments of human societies. Subject matter looks at the context and impact of European invasion and colonization on western indigenous cultures. It compares the differing approaches to European colonization in the Western Hemisphere, their cultural and environmental impacts, and explores the spread and impact of the world’s major religions. Course will examine how human activity affects the physical environment and how physical environment impacts human living conditions. Basic economic concepts and their impacts will be examined. Students will explore differing cultural perspectives and their global interdependence.

Current Events

Students will examine the role knowledge of current events plays in day-to-day life and in daily and long range decision making. Students will look at what events they follow and why they are drawn to them. We will examine local, regional, national, and international news currents, the differences in them and how they may interact and affect ones daily life. Students will examine both one-off stories and unfolding/continuing stories.

Students will learn about the structure of a good news story and the varied media available for accessing news information. Sources will be analyzed for reliability and accuracy.

Students will daily read and summarize a story from one of the four areas of coverage. By the end of each week, students will have summarized a story from each of the areas of coverage. Weekly, students will orally share with the class one of their stories and their impressions on it.