Building brighter tomorrows
for the boys of today.

Cherry Gulch’s math program balances the mastery of fundamental skills with critical thinking, problem solving and reasoning. We emphasize active approaches to engage students in mathematical concepts and applications.

This is achieved by aligning the math classes to the Common Core State Standards. These standards are the same for 48 of the 50 United States. Cherry Gulch’s math program also follows the traditional pathway that is outlined inside the Common Core Standards (Algebra, Geometry and Algebra II)

Cherry Gulch also participates in Lego League, TARC (Team America Rocketry Challenge), and Math Counts. Competing in competitions teaches students the value of mathematical concepts, as well as, teamwork in a fun and safe environment.

Cherry Gulch teaches to a wide range of academic abilities: ranging from more basic elementary math to algebra and geometry. Our small class sizes create the perfect combination of general instruction, group work, and one-on-one assistance. We impress upon our students the importance of being neat, organized, and being prideful in their work. All these elements combine to assist our students in being successful at Cherry Gulch.

Progressing in Mathematics (Grades 5 - 6):

Progressing in Mathematics is a course designed to teach students basic mathematical practices and thinking. Students will develop problem solving skills and mathematical reasoning so they can be confident once they enter into middle school mathematics. Other topics covered in this class are : rates and ratios, division, rational numbers and integers, proportional relationships, linear equations, measurement, functions and the Pythagorean Theorem.

Junior High Math Fundamentals (Grades 7 - 8):

Purpose is to formalize and extend the mathematics that student’s learned through elementary school. The Common Core Standard for Middle school math has broken the information up in the following 6 critical thinking areas. The critical units of study are as follows:
1. Relationships between quantities
2. Linear and Exponential relationship
3. Reasoning with equations
4. Descriptive Statistics
5. Congruence, proof, constructions
6. Connecting algebra and geometry through coordinates

Pre-Algebra ( 6th – 8th graders):

Pre- Algebra I is a course used to formalize and extend the mathematics that students have learned in the middle grades to assist with preparing them for Algebra I. The Common Core Standards break Algebra into 5 critical units of study that coincides with the Algebraic units.
1. Relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations.
2. Linear and Exponential relationships.
3. Descriptive Statistics.
4. Expressions and Equations:
5. Quadratic Functions and Modeling.

Algebra I (Core – 1 Year Credit: 7th - 9th graders):

Algebra I is a course used to formalize and extend the mathematics that students have learned in the middle grades. The Common Core Standards break Algebra into 5 critical units of study. They include:

1. Relationships between quantities and reasoning with equations.
a. Reason quantitatively and use different units to solve problems.
b. Create equations and describe their meaning
c. Solve equations and inequality with one variable.

2. Linear and Exponential relationships.
a. Extend properties to solve and interpret strategies
b. Solve problems graphically
c. Analyze and define functions

3. Descriptive Statistics.
a. Summarize, represent, and interpret data on a single count or two categorical variables
b. Interpret linear models

4. Expressions and Equations:
a. Interpret and write expressions and use them to solve problems
b. Perform operations on polynomials
c. Solve equations and inequalities with one variable.

5. Quadratic Functions and Modeling.
a. Learn properties of rational and irrational numbers
b. Analyze functions using different representations
c. Construct and compare linear, quadratic and exponential models and solve problems

Geometry (Core – 1 Year Credit: Grades 9th and 10th ):

Geometry’s purpose is to formalize and extend students’ geometric experiences. The Common Core Standards breaks Geometry into 6 critical units of study. There is also a strong focus on building and understanding proofs. The critical units of study are as follows:
1. Congruence, Proof and Constructions
a. Experiment with transformations
b. Create and prove geometric theorems
c. Understand congruence in terms of rigid motion

2. Similarity, Proof, and trigonometry
a. Understand similarity in terms of similarity transformation
b. Prove theorems involving similarity
c. Apply geometric and trigonometric concepts in modeling situations

3. Extending to three Dimensions
a. Explain volume formula and use them to solve problems
b. Visualize the relation between two dimensional and three dimensional objects
c. Apply geometric concepts in modeling situations

4. Connecting Algebra and Geometry through coordinates
a. Use coordinates to prove simple geometric theorems algebraically
b. Translate between the geometric description and the equation for a conic section

5. Circles with and without coordinates
a. Understand circular vocabulary and apply theorems to them
b. Use coordinates to prove simple geometric theorems algebraically
c. Apply geometric concepts to modeling situations

6. Applications of Probability
a. Understand independence and conditional probability to interpret data
b. Use probability to evaluate outcome of decisions

Algebra II (Core – 1 Year Credit: grades 10th and 11th ):

Algebra II builds on the foundation laid in Algebra I through working with linear, quadratic and exponential functions. The Common Core Standards breaks Algebra II into 4 critical units of study. The critical units of study are as follows:
1. Polynomial, rational, and Radical relationships
a. Perform arithmetic operations with complex numbers
b. Interpret the structure of expressions
c. Understand the relationship between zero’s and factors of polynomials
d. Analyze functions using different representations

2. Trigonometric Functions
a. Extend the domain of trigonometric functions in a circle
b. Prove and apply trigonometric identities

3. Modeling with Function
a. Create Equations that describe numbers or relationships
b. Interpret functions that arise in application in terms of context
c. Build new functions from existing functions

4. Inferences and Conclusions from Data
a. Summarize, represent, and interpret data on single count
b. Understand and evaluate random processes underlying statistical experiments
c. Use probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions

 

Environmental Science

Environmental Science is the study of the environment with an emphasis of our impact on it. The first important concept of environmental science is recognizing our planet as a closed circuit. We study cycles such as the water, carbon and the nitrogen cycle. During this time, we learn about what happens when these cycles get out of balance to create problems such as global warming, water shortages, and algae blooms. We learn about food webs, cornerstone species, and the biomes they inhabit. The main idea of these subjects is to teach students that if you affect one part of a cycle or a food web, you inevitably affect many other parts. We also study topics such as food and agriculture, human health and toxins, earth resources and energy. This class makes students aware of continuous problems in our environment, but also offers solutions and ways we are trying to improve the impact we have on the world around us.

Biology

Biology is the study of life from its simplest forms to the most majestic creatures among us. It asks questions such as “What does it mean to be alive?” Starting at the basics, we study both plant and animal cells. We then study simple life forms such as bacteria and viruses. Many other topics follow including plants, photosynthesis, animals, cellular respiration, classification, genetics, ecology, human body systems, and human health. The approach to teaching these subjects is as hands-on as possible. If there is any form of presentation, it involves a lot of pictures, video clips, and animation. The idea is to bring things alive to the students and make learning tangible and applicable.

Integrated Science

Integrated Science touches on many different branches of science. It’s a middle school course that starts at the basics of science. It includes mass and matter, elements and compounds, and the basic laws of physics. We then move into the earth around us to include studies of geography and biomes. The course then takes a turn into studying what lives in these environments including simple life forms, plants, and animals. The aim or goal of this course is to encompass what it means to study science. The course is very hands-on and includes many experiments and physical examples. Learning is done through actually doing science. It is important that students have a curiosity for the world around them and this course intends to encourage that.

Writing Workshop (Grades 5-11)

Students will complete a wide variety of sustained and self-directed writing projects in a workshop setting. Lessons will focus on practical issues that writers face in their work (for example, how to infuse subtle persuasion, balancing plot and character development, building tension, etc.). As in professional workshops, emphasis will be placed on sharing work with the class, peer conferencing and editing, and developing a diverse portfolio including poetry, fiction, drama, memoir, and essays. Each week, students will meet individually with the teacher as a writing coach to determine strengths and opportunities for growth.

 

Reading Workshop (Grades 5-11)

Students will work to become skilled, passionate, habitual, critical readers in a self-directed workshop setting. Each student will have a goal of completing at least 40 books over the course of the school year, covering a variety of genres including classic literature, biography, modern realistic fiction and graphic works. Lessons will focus on essential elements of reading comprehension and literary analysis (for example, making connections, main idea and author’s purpose, comprehension self-monitoring, etc.). Each week, students will meet individually with the teacher as a reading coach to determine strengths and opportunities for growth.

 

U. S. History

This course will explore the cultural and social development of the United States and the role of migration and immigration of diverse peoples, cultures, and social influences on the nation’s growth. Students will examine common traits, beliefs, and characteristics that unite the United States as a nation and a society. Students will examine the political, social, and economic responses to industrial and technological advancements. Students will explore multiple perspectives throughout the growth and development of the United States. Subject material will look at the Revolutionary period, development of the Constitution, exploration and expansion, emergence as a world power, and the country’s role in the contemporary world.

World History

The study of World History provides students multiple opportunities to build their critical thinking, writing, and public speaking skills. Students will develop skills to interpret evidence and evaluate multiple resources. Subject matter examines the rise and development of civilization and the roles of geography, human innovation, ideas, ideology, expansion, war, migration and settlement of human populations in shaping civilizations. Material will explore the economic and social development of human civilization while building an understanding of the evolution of democracy. Subject matter looks at early civilizations, the time of empires, development of Europe, Industrialization, Imperialism, World War, nuclear weapons, the role of the United Nations, and the roles of the Middle East, China, and Russia.

Geography-Eastern Hemisphere

This course seeks to build an understanding of the cultural and social developmenst of human societies. Subject matter looks at the context and impact of mass migration/invasion and colonization on indigenous eastern cultures. It compares the varied approaches of European colonization in the Eastern Hemisphere, their cultural and environmental impacts, and explores origins and spread of the world’s major religions. Course will examine how human activity affects the physical environment and how physical environment impacts human living conditions. Basic economic concepts and their impacts will be examined. Students will explore differing cultural perspectives and their global interdependence.

Geography-Western Hemisphere

This course seeks to build an understanding of the cultural and social developments of human societies. Subject matter looks at the context and impact of European invasion and colonization on western indigenous cultures. It compares the differing approaches to European colonization in the Western Hemisphere, their cultural and environmental impacts, and explores the spread and impact of the world’s major religions. Course will examine how human activity affects the physical environment and how physical environment impacts human living conditions. Basic economic concepts and their impacts will be examined. Students will explore differing cultural perspectives and their global interdependence.

Current Events

Students will examine the role knowledge of current events plays in day-to-day life and in daily and long range decision making. Students will look at what events they follow and why they are drawn to them. We will examine local, regional, national, and international news currents, the differences in them and how they may interact and affect ones daily life. Students will examine both one-off stories and unfolding/continuing stories.

Students will learn about the structure of a good news story and the varied media available for accessing news information. Sources will be analyzed for reliability and accuracy.

Students will daily read and summarize a story from one of the four areas of coverage. By the end of each week, students will have summarized a story from each of the areas of coverage. Weekly, students will orally share with the class one of their stories and their impressions on it.

 

The P.E. classes at Cherry Gulch give each student the opportunity to learn physical skills and further knowledge of various types of sports. The students are enrolled in strength and conditioning classes for their physical health, growth, and development. The main goal and purpose of the class is to help each student gain confidence in themselves now and throughout their lives.

Mondays- Stretching routine, Agilities, Cardiovascular, Sports knowledge, Free play

Tuesdays- Strength and Conditioning Training

Wednesdays- Stretching routine, Agilities, Cardiovascular, Sports knowledge, Free play

Thursdays- Strength and Conditioning Training

Fridays- Stretching routine, Agilities, Cardiovascular, Sports knowledge, Free play

This is a brief sketch of our weekly P.E. classes. We will also be working to meet the Presidential Physical Fitness Program Standards.